SG LEWIS

Three years since first emerging as Britain’s emotive dance music maker-in-chief, SG Lewis is back with a new record and a renewed sense of purpose. After two EPs, 2015’s Shivers and 2016’s Yours, a period that saw him crafting hits for rising artists Dave (100Ms) and Ray BLK (Chill Out), the Reading-born producer-cum-songwriter-cum-DJ returns with a three part ode to club music: Dusk, Dark, Dawn.

“Everything I do stems club culture,” he says of the concept. “Dusk, Dark, Dawn is about taking the intentions of that music – all those feelings and experiences, those amazing emotions I had from the age of 17 to 19 – and placing them outside of the context of the club. Those memories of being a young person and having my mind blown by this thing I never knew existed.”

So, then to new project ‘Dusk, Dark, Dawn’. Presented over three parts, each representing three distinct moods of a night out, it sees Sam in full-blown curator mode, drawing on a host of soon-to-be-announced collaborators to communicate the different parts of what he does via a trio of distinct sonic worlds. Opening the journey is a collaboration with rising British songwriter J Warner – a hazy, warm prelude to the first phase of the night.

The album’s first phase – ‘Dusk’ – plays with 80’s synths, inviting warm-up house and disco. “Disco has always had the association of the start of a night for me. I spent a lot a time as a resident DJ in clubs and disco was always that magnetic genre, always brought people onto the dancefloor.” This phase of the album takes place at sun-down, where apprehension and excitement for the night ahead reign. “There’s an undeniable beauty to this part of the night. The warm-up for heavier, darker things to come.” Followed soon by ‘Dark’ and ‘Dawn’, SG Lewis blends genre and tempo throughout the record to take the listener on a narrative arc, filling the music with the emotions associated with a night both inside and outside the club.

“I felt like I’d shown certain things on the first two EPS and the last thing I wanted to do was exactly the same thing again,” he says. “I didn’t want to put stuff out for the sake of putting stuff out, so I stepped back for a minute. I spent a bit of time figuring everything out and I really feel… I used the word ‘bulletproof’ the other day, because everything I’m making and putting out is music that I love. It sounds like a cheesy thing to say but I really am making music because it makes me happy.”